NATURALLY: Don’t let the music stop

warbler“Nova Scotia is an excellent location to raise a family, and not just for humans”, writes Donna Crossland to introduce her article about the arrival of songbirds from afar and their efforts to raise families here. “Before the hardwoods have flushed their first leaves and many other warblers have yet returned to Nova Scotia, the voice of the northern parula warbler emanates from woodlands and forest edges. It is one of my favourite sounds of early May.” As the most beautiful of our warblers, Donna chooses the Blackburnian warbler. “The brilliant, orange throat of the male is a showstopper. Blackburnians return each year to reside high in a canopy that is generally dominated by eastern hemlock.” She expresses concern about the ongoing loss of habitat for such species as we continue to clearcut even mature hemlock for fibre. View online version of the article

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Eagles – Too much of a good thing?

eagleMarkEIn this month’s Nova Scotia naturally column, Mark Elderkin asks whether our feeding bald eagles during the winter has been overly successful in helping this species to recover from its precipitous decline between 1940 and 1960. “About 100 breeding pairs of bald eagles were shared between Maine, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island in 1980. Today, the number of breeding pairs for these same jurisdictions is well over 1,100. This does not include the hundreds of non-breeding eagles that now summer along our coastal shores…Evidence suggests eagles are now impacting seabird colonies and are being negatively affected by secondary lead poisoning from harvested big game byproducts thrown out by meat cutters. Winter feeding also causes unnaturally high concentrations of wildlife, including coyotes, which increases the potential risks for conflicts with people.” Read more

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Nova Scotia’s rare fire-dependent ecosystem

Jack Pine, Broom Crowberry & Huckleberry in the Purcell's Cove Backlands In the March 2014 column, Nick Hill and Dave Patriquin describe the infrequent meeting of the boreal jack pine and the southern broom crowberry, which occurs primarily in habitats naturally prone to repeated fires. It is found in a handful of sites in Nova Scotia, at even fewer sites in coastal Maine and nowhere else. Read more

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How Dad’s view of deadwood changed

Deadwood-Photo-2smIn this month’s column, Matt Miller describes how his Dad’s view of how he saw and managed the family woodlot has changed over time. Once seeing deadwood as a nuisance to be removed, today he see’s it as an essential component of a healthy forest. View article

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Welcome

Welcome to our website, posted January 29, 2014. It’s main function is to collate articles we have written under the banner Naturally Nova Scotia in weekend issues of the Chronicle Herald, and to hear from our readers. In time we will add photos and links to supplement the articles. ‘Look forward to hearing from you!

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